yoga teacher adjustments
When is it okay to touch a student?

Working within the nuances of the yoga teaching industry is in some ways eerily similar to what you may have learnt from other industries, but there are some key differences. Because of the nature of the yoga and it’s deep spiritual element, it can be a truly fascinating place to do business. Success in the industry comes from creating networks, building a sense of value, and making yourself stand out from the crowd.

First things first when it comes to yoga teaching

You might think you’re just yoga teaching, but you’re also a business owner now, so make sure you have an ABN and keep a record of all your work-related spending and income for tax purposes. Getting a proper accountant with whom you have a good rapport will work wonders.

Relationships with studios and people of influence

Your first priority should be to harbour positive relationships with everyone in the industry. Prioritise relationships over short-term advantage, and only interact on a positive level. The key to dealing with challenging people is simple kill them with kindness. Allow yourself to have space and time in challenging interactions, then simply make the decision to respond with love and positivity.

The art of negotiation 

Negotiating a rate

Negotiating a good rate for your studio classes is important. It’ll make you feel valued, and avoid the need to overwork or tire yourself out. There are two main ways we get paid as studio teachers. The first is a flat negotiated rate, or a retainer and a per student bonus.